In recent years many school districts have had to restructure their arts curriculums to meet the growing emphasis on standards that is central to most school reform. This unique collection is meant to assist educators, policymakers, grantmakers and other stakeholders by focusing on the potential benefits of arts education for students and communities alike, and providing examples of creative ways school districts are handling their constraints.

Search this collection

Clear all

12 results found

reorder grid_view

ARISE 2010 Final Performance Report to the US Department of Education

February 28, 2011

This is the final performance reports from the Performing Arts Workshop to the U.S. Department of Education about Project ARISE (Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education). The report includes performance measure data for the Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) grants program. The ARISE Project offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 25 and 30 weeks in theater arts and creative movement for third to fifth grade students. Classrooms participating in ARISE are identified as Special Day Classes or general education classes with special education inclusion (or mainstreamed) students. The ARISE residencies emphasize critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. Over three years from 2008 to 2010, the Workshop provided ARISE residencies to 63 classrooms from five schools within the San Francisco Unified School District.

Student Outcomes

ARISE 2010 Annual Performance Report to the US Department of Education

September 30, 2010

This is the third of three performance reports from the Performing Arts Workshop to the U.S. Department of Education about Project ARISE (Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education). The report includes performance measure data for the Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) grants program. The ARISE Project offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 25 and 30 weeks in theater arts and creative movement for third to fifth grade students. Classrooms participating in ARISE are identified as Special Day Classes or general education classes with special education inclusion (or mainstreamed) students. The ARISE residences emphasize critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. In the 2009-2010 school year, the Workshop provided ARISE residencies to 18 classrooms from four schools within the San Francisco Unified School District.

Student Outcomes

ARISE 2009 Annual Performance Report to the US Department of Education

November 11, 2009

This is the second of three annual performance reports from the Performing Arts Workshop to the U.S. Department of Education about Project ARISE (Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education). The report includes performance measure data for the Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) grants program. The ARISE Project offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 25 and 30 weeks in theater arts and creative movement for third to fifth grade students. Classrooms participating in ARISE are identified as Special Day Classes or general education classes with special education inclusion (or mainstreamed) students. The ARISE residencies emphasize critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. In the 2008-09 school year, the Workshop provided ARISE residencies to 22 classrooms from five schools within the San Francisco Unified School District

Student Outcomes

Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education 2008 Evaluation Report

November 13, 2008

This report includes evaluation findings from the first of three years of data collection for the Performing Arts Workshop's ARISE Project (Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education). The ARISE Project offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 25 and 30 weeks in theater arts and creative movement for third to fifth grade students. Classrooms participating in ARISE are identified as Special Day Classes or general education classes with special education inclusion (or mainstreamed) students. The ARISE residencies emphasize critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. In the 2007-08 school year, the Workshop provided ARISE residencies to 24 classrooms from five schools within the San Francisco Unified School District. The report includes the ARISE program methodology; the evaluation methodology; background information on arts education for students in special education; results from the data collected during the 2007-08 school year; a discussion of factors that affect findings and program impact; and recommendations. The appendices to this report include our statistical analysis, data collection instruments, and informed consent forms.

Student Outcomes

ARISE 2008 Annual Performance Report to the US Department of Education

November 13, 2008

This is the first of three annual performance reports from the Performing Arts Workshop to the U.S. Department of Education about Project ARISE (Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education). The report includes performance measure data for the Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) grants program. The ARISE Project offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 25 and 30 weeks in theater arts and creative movement for third to fifth grade students. Classrooms participating in ARISE are identified as Special Day Classes or general education classes with special education inclusion (or mainstreamed) students. The ARISE residencies emphasize critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. In the 2007-08 school year, the Workshop provided ARISE residencies to 24 classrooms from five schools within the San Francisco Unified School District.

Student Outcomes

The Workshop Out of School Guide

June 30, 2008

The guide is a direct result of the Workshop's After School for All (AFA) project, and was funded by the San Francisco Department of Children, Youth & Their Families. In the guide, Lead Writer (and former Associate Artistic Director) Anne-E Wood offers a thorough examination of arts engagement during after school time and in community centers. The Workshop Out of School provides a clear process for quality performing arts instruction that negotiates the specific challenges of after-school programs. The guide is divided by discipline into five chapters in which AFA artists outline the character of their disciplines: creative movement, world dance, theater arts, creative writing, and music. Each chapter includes an overview of the discipline, instructions on how to plan a quality curriculum, and how to negotiate behavior and content management within the class. Also included are a sample curriculum and a breakdown of individual lesson plans.

Classroom Examples

Performing Arts Workshop 2003 AEMDD Evaluation Final Report

February 1, 2007

This report presents the outcomes from the final year of the Performing Arts Workshop Artists-in-Schools (AIS) program evaluation, conducted from 2003 to 2006. The AIS program offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 8 and 30 weeks in theatre arts, creative writing, creative movement, music and world dance. While AIS classrooms range from pre-kindergarten to 12th grade, the evaluation focused on elementary classrooms. AIS residencies emphasize problem-solving and critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. In 2006, the Workshop employed 26 artists who provided AIS residencies to 183 classrooms from pre-Kindergarten to 12h grade in 20 schools in 7 school districts. The report includes a foreword by Richard Siegesmund of the University of Georgia on key data findings; the Artists-in-Schools program methodology; the evaluation methodology; cumulative findings from this three-year project on critical thinking in the arts, arts and academic performance, the pedagogy for teaching at-risk youth, the arts and pro-social behavior and institutionalizing the arts in school settings; and recommendations. The appendices to this report include data collection instruments and informed consent forms.

Student Outcomes

Lessons from the Workshop: A Guide to Best Practices in Performing Arts Education

March 16, 2006

Developed by the Workshop's Associate Artistic Director, Anne-E Wood, the Best Practices Guide is a hands-on tool for school administrators, teachers, artists, parents or arts organizations facilitating an artist residency program. The guide explains arts education within the framework of educational policy and practice in California, but the model can be adapted for many communities. In this guide, you will learn about the residency model, the history of Performing Arts Workshop's residency model and what 40 years of experience has shown to be the best practices for artists and teachers.

Classroom Examples

Artists-In-Schools (AIS) Second-Year Annual Evaluation Report for the U.S. Dept. of Education (2004-05)

November 15, 2005

Over the course of three years, Performing Arts Workshop and evaluators measured five goals of the Workshop's Artists-in-Schools program. These goals were: to improve student critical thinking in the arts, to use the arts to positively impact academic performance, to identify problems in teaching at-risk youth, to use the arts to develop pro-social behavior, and to institutionalize arts and arts education in school settings to increase sustainability. The ability of the Artists-in-Schools program to meet these goals is examined through a quasi-experimental, mixed-method research design.

Student Outcomes

Artists-In-Schools (AIS) First-Year Annual Evaluation Report for the U.S. Dept. of Education (2003-04)

November 15, 2004

Over the course of three years, Performing Arts Workshop and evaluators measured five goals of the Workshop's Artists-in-Schools program. These goals were: to improve student critical thinking in the arts, to use the arts to positively impact academic performance, to identify problems in teaching at-risk youth, to use the arts to develop pro-social behavior, and to institutionalize arts and arts education in school settings to increase sustainability. The ability of the Artists-in-Schools program to meet these goals is examined through a quasi-experimental, mixed-method research design in the following reports.

Student Outcomes

Assessing Thinking In and Through the Arts: Second Year Evaluation of the California Arts Demonstration Project

August 30, 2003

For two years, the Workshop participated in an evaluation project run by the California Arts Council. The goals of this project were to identify potentially "at-risk" student populations and then evaluate the effects of a Creative Movement or Theatre residency in the classroom. Areas for student improvement were based on the Workshop's Cycle of Artistic Inquiry which seeks to demonstrate the process of critical thinking through arts learning. The following reports deal with the findings of this project at three separate locations: The Paul Robeson & Diego Rivera Academy, John Muir Elementary, and Mission Education Center.

Student Outcomes

First-Year Demonstration Project Report for the CAC (2001-02)

August 9, 2002

For two years, the Workshop participated in an evaluation project run by the California Arts Council. The goals of this project were to identify potentially "at-risk" student populations and then evaluate the effects of a Creative Movement or Theatre residency in the classroom. Areas for student improvement were based on the Workshop's Cycle of Artistic Inquiry which seeks to demonstrate the process of critical thinking through arts learning. The following reports deal with the findings of this project at three separate locations: The Paul Robeson & Diego Rivera Academy, John Muir Elementary, and Mission Education Center.

Student Outcomes