In recent years many school districts have had to restructure their arts curriculums to meet the growing emphasis on standards that is central to most school reform. This unique collection is meant to assist educators, policymakers, grantmakers and other stakeholders by focusing on the potential benefits of arts education for students and communities alike, and providing examples of creative ways school districts are handling their constraints.

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ARISE 2010 Final Performance Report to the US Department of Education

February 28, 2011

This is the final performance reports from the Performing Arts Workshop to the U.S. Department of Education about Project ARISE (Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education). The report includes performance measure data for the Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) grants program. The ARISE Project offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 25 and 30 weeks in theater arts and creative movement for third to fifth grade students. Classrooms participating in ARISE are identified as Special Day Classes or general education classes with special education inclusion (or mainstreamed) students. The ARISE residencies emphasize critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. Over three years from 2008 to 2010, the Workshop provided ARISE residencies to 63 classrooms from five schools within the San Francisco Unified School District.

Student Outcomes

ARISE 2010 Annual Performance Report to the US Department of Education

September 30, 2010

This is the third of three performance reports from the Performing Arts Workshop to the U.S. Department of Education about Project ARISE (Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education). The report includes performance measure data for the Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) grants program. The ARISE Project offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 25 and 30 weeks in theater arts and creative movement for third to fifth grade students. Classrooms participating in ARISE are identified as Special Day Classes or general education classes with special education inclusion (or mainstreamed) students. The ARISE residences emphasize critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. In the 2009-2010 school year, the Workshop provided ARISE residencies to 18 classrooms from four schools within the San Francisco Unified School District.

Student Outcomes

ARISE 2009 Annual Performance Report to the US Department of Education

November 11, 2009

This is the second of three annual performance reports from the Performing Arts Workshop to the U.S. Department of Education about Project ARISE (Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education). The report includes performance measure data for the Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) grants program. The ARISE Project offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 25 and 30 weeks in theater arts and creative movement for third to fifth grade students. Classrooms participating in ARISE are identified as Special Day Classes or general education classes with special education inclusion (or mainstreamed) students. The ARISE residencies emphasize critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. In the 2008-09 school year, the Workshop provided ARISE residencies to 22 classrooms from five schools within the San Francisco Unified School District

Student Outcomes

Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education 2008 Evaluation Report

November 13, 2008

This report includes evaluation findings from the first of three years of data collection for the Performing Arts Workshop's ARISE Project (Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education). The ARISE Project offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 25 and 30 weeks in theater arts and creative movement for third to fifth grade students. Classrooms participating in ARISE are identified as Special Day Classes or general education classes with special education inclusion (or mainstreamed) students. The ARISE residencies emphasize critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. In the 2007-08 school year, the Workshop provided ARISE residencies to 24 classrooms from five schools within the San Francisco Unified School District. The report includes the ARISE program methodology; the evaluation methodology; background information on arts education for students in special education; results from the data collected during the 2007-08 school year; a discussion of factors that affect findings and program impact; and recommendations. The appendices to this report include our statistical analysis, data collection instruments, and informed consent forms.

Student Outcomes

ARISE 2008 Annual Performance Report to the US Department of Education

November 13, 2008

This is the first of three annual performance reports from the Performing Arts Workshop to the U.S. Department of Education about Project ARISE (Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education). The report includes performance measure data for the Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) grants program. The ARISE Project offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 25 and 30 weeks in theater arts and creative movement for third to fifth grade students. Classrooms participating in ARISE are identified as Special Day Classes or general education classes with special education inclusion (or mainstreamed) students. The ARISE residencies emphasize critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. In the 2007-08 school year, the Workshop provided ARISE residencies to 24 classrooms from five schools within the San Francisco Unified School District.

Student Outcomes

The Workshop Out of School Guide

June 30, 2008

The guide is a direct result of the Workshop's After School for All (AFA) project, and was funded by the San Francisco Department of Children, Youth & Their Families. In the guide, Lead Writer (and former Associate Artistic Director) Anne-E Wood offers a thorough examination of arts engagement during after school time and in community centers. The Workshop Out of School provides a clear process for quality performing arts instruction that negotiates the specific challenges of after-school programs. The guide is divided by discipline into five chapters in which AFA artists outline the character of their disciplines: creative movement, world dance, theater arts, creative writing, and music. Each chapter includes an overview of the discipline, instructions on how to plan a quality curriculum, and how to negotiate behavior and content management within the class. Also included are a sample curriculum and a breakdown of individual lesson plans.

Classroom Examples

Excellence on Stage and in Life: The Mosaic Model for Youth Development through the Arts

February 20, 2008

In 2008, Mosaic released the findings of a three-year study conducted by the University of Michigan Department of Psychology, The Detroit Initiative and area-Detroit community based organizations. The study identifies and assesses the internationally acclaimed, professional performing arts training program's goals, practice methods, and expected outcome. Mosaic seeks to empower young people with the tools necessary to create positive changes in their lives and communities by helping them to develop patterns of cooperation, disciplined work habits and effective problem-solving skills through the creation of high-quality, professional-level performances of theatre and music. By highlighting the immense talent of young Detroiters, Mosaic helps to create positive peer role models and young people who can view a more positive future for themselves and for their community.

Classroom Examples

Mixing the Digital, Social, and Cultural: Learning, Identity, and Agency in Youth Participation

January 1, 2008

Part of the Volume on Youth, Identity, and Digital MediaHow do youth use media and technology as they learn to be participants in civic and democratic practices? We share two case studies -- one from a media arts production organization and one from a school board youth group -- that revolve around youth-adult interactions in learning environments that offer youth real opportunities to be influential in their respective communities. The cases feature youth and their involvements with digital media, pedagogical approaches, and engagements that enhance their participatory capacities. There are multiple channels through which these interactions happen, some with and facilitated by adults and others created and negotiated by youth. We describe how youth and adults establish learning environments for each other, negotiate the grounds for participation, and explore the possibilities and limitations of social and digital technologies in these processes, supporting the idea that this learning is something that young people do as agents in their development.

Classroom Examples

Deconstructing Engagement: A First Generation Report on the ArtsSmarts Student Engagement Questionnaire

October 12, 2007

During the school year 2006-2007, ArtsSmarts representatives collaborated with Karen Hume to design a questionnaire to measure students' engagement before and after ArtsSmarts programs. The questionnaire was administered to a large number of students who were being taught by an ArtsSmarts team comprised of an artist and a teacher. ArtsSmarts uses an innovative approach to arts integration, by allowing the self construction of programming in classrooms; and by acting as a facilitator in providing resources for artists and teachers teams develop programming for students in their classrooms. This programming develops a context where student learning and engagement in tasks and activities can take place. ArtsSmarts does not dictate this creative process; rather, it plays a supportive role in acting as a reference point for the teacher-artist teams to rely on. This approach not only allows for the innovation to evolve organically from the generation of the artist-teacher teams to student interaction, but also excites the creative learning process within the classroom. This report is a summary of the results from this first administration of the ArtsSmarts Student Engagement Questionnaire (i.e., first generation). The overall purpose of this report is firstly to examine student engagement, and secondly to examine the quality of the questionnaire, for further refinements. This report has three areas of focus: 1. To summarize the responses of students who completed the questionnaire.2. To compare student engagement before and after intervention.3. To identify strengths and weakness in the questionnaire for further revisions.

Student Outcomes

Engaged in Learning: The ArtsSmarts Model

February 5, 2007

Approximately a dozen internal research studies into student learning and program effectiveness were conducted during ArtsSmarts' first eight years. In the spring of 2006, we compiled the results of those studies, along with a like number of reports by outside researchers, to create a synthesis of possible directions for future work. Although we used a small sample of available outside studies, it was immediately and glaringly evident that the arts and educational communities are hungering for research that will "help us understand what the arts learning experience is for children, and what characteristics of that experience are likely to travel across domains of learning" (Deasy, 2002:99). It was equally evident to all ArtsSmarts partners that, while future ArtsSmarts research could be taken in any number of directions, it made the most sense to identify and build from ArtsSmarts' own strengths and successes. We also felt the need to align the research direction and the methods of data collection with our intended audiences.Different groups would find different aspects of ArtsSmarts compelling, and distinctly different types of data would be required for each. Partners identified educators (teachers, administrators, and senior Board office personnel) as the audience they most wanted to reach.With that in mind, the decision was made to develop a theory of learning that would serve the dual purposes of explaining ArtsSmarts' impact in Canadian classrooms and framing the research work of the next few years. We felt that establishing an ArtsSmarts theory of learning would help to answer the question, "If ArtsSmarts didn't exist, what would be lost?" Further, a theory of learning would assist teachers, artists and partners in identifying key, essential components of the ArtsSmarts experience, and would also prevent ArtsSmarts from being viewed as a pleasant but unnecessary add-on to classroom activity. The paper that follows develops an ArtsSmarts theory of learning centred on the concept of student engagement.

Classroom Examples

Performing Arts Workshop 2003 AEMDD Evaluation Final Report

February 1, 2007

This report presents the outcomes from the final year of the Performing Arts Workshop Artists-in-Schools (AIS) program evaluation, conducted from 2003 to 2006. The AIS program offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 8 and 30 weeks in theatre arts, creative writing, creative movement, music and world dance. While AIS classrooms range from pre-kindergarten to 12th grade, the evaluation focused on elementary classrooms. AIS residencies emphasize problem-solving and critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. In 2006, the Workshop employed 26 artists who provided AIS residencies to 183 classrooms from pre-Kindergarten to 12h grade in 20 schools in 7 school districts. The report includes a foreword by Richard Siegesmund of the University of Georgia on key data findings; the Artists-in-Schools program methodology; the evaluation methodology; cumulative findings from this three-year project on critical thinking in the arts, arts and academic performance, the pedagogy for teaching at-risk youth, the arts and pro-social behavior and institutionalizing the arts in school settings; and recommendations. The appendices to this report include data collection instruments and informed consent forms.

Student Outcomes

After-School Programs and Academic Impact: A Study of Chicago's After School Matters

January 26, 2007

What impact can after-school programs have on the educational achievement of high school students? A new study of Chicago's After School Matters (ASM) program -- which offers paid internships in the arts, technology, sports, and communications to teenagers in some of the city's most underserved schools -- finds a relationship between participating in after-school activities and higher class attendance, lower course failures and higher graduation rates.Even after taking into account student demographic characteristics and prior attendance records, students who participate in ASM miss fewer days of school than their classmates. Similarly, students who participated at the highest levels in the after-school program tended to fail fewer core academic courses (English, Math, Science, and Social Studies). Furthermore, over the course of their time in high school, students who were enrolled in ASM for three or more semesters and those who participated at the highest levels had higher rates of graduation and lower dropout rates than similar students who did not participate in the program.The findings in this report highlight the importance of further research into what leads students to participate in after-school programs and the factors that lead to higher engagement and retention once they are enrolled. A better understanding is crucial for improving enrollment in after-school programs such as ASM. Moreover, accounting for student factors that lead to a greater engagement in the program will lead to a clearer understanding of ASM's contribution to the positive outcomes -- independent of hard-to-observe student characteristics such as enthusiasm or dedication.

Student Outcomes