In recent years many school districts have had to restructure their arts curriculums to meet the growing emphasis on standards that is central to most school reform. This unique collection is meant to assist educators, policymakers, grantmakers and other stakeholders by focusing on the potential benefits of arts education for students and communities alike, and providing examples of creative ways school districts are handling their constraints.

Search this collection

Clear all

14 results found

reorder grid_view

The Retention of Chicago's Arts Students in Comparative Perspective

May 28, 2014

Highlights:* 58 percent of Chicago arts-school alumni took up residence in the city within 5 years of the date of their last attendance. Of the regions compared in this report, only New York City has a greater portion of its arts-school alumni taking up residence in the city within 5 years, at 66 percent.* 51 percent of Chicago arts-school alumni were out-of-state applicants who came to Chicago and were still living in the city within five years of their last date of attendance. This is the second highest portion of out-of-state applicants taking up residence in the city of their alma mater. New York City's rate was highest at 54 percent.* Of arts-school alumni who searched for work, 38 percent of those attending school in Chicago obtained work prior to leaving their institution; 85 percent obtained work within a year. Alumni from other regions had similar experiences.*50 percent of Chicago's alumni reported that their first job or work experience was "closely related" to their arts-school training. However, alumni from institutions in Los Angeles County, Cleveland/Columbus and New York City reported higher rates of their first work experience being closely related to their arts training.

An Unfinished Canvas: District Capacity and the Use of New State Funds for Arts Education in California

April 6, 2009

Questions about district leadership and capacity -- particularly in light of the new funding -- served as the impetus for this study. Through a survey of leaders in 385 districts, we assessed districts' capacity with respect to arts education, explored early spending choices, and examined the relationship between the two. We also studied changes in arts education since the new resources became available and worked to understand the barriers that continue to stand in the way of comprehensive arts education for all California students.

Student Outcomes

From Hip-Hop to Shakespeare: Dallas Blazes Coordinated Trail in Arts Education for City Young People

July 25, 2008

Describes the trend toward coordinated approaches to arts education, with a focus on a Wallace-funded program linking artists, local government, cultural organizations, schools, and parents to bring quality arts education to Dallas' poorest children.

Classroom Examples

Annotated Bibliography on Research Related to Arts for Children & Youth

June 29, 2008

Provides a bibliography of reports demonstrating the positive effects of arts education on children and youth. Includes hyperlinks and abstracts.

Student Outcomes

After-School Programs and Academic Impact: A Study of Chicago's After School Matters

January 26, 2007

What impact can after-school programs have on the educational achievement of high school students? A new study of Chicago's After School Matters (ASM) program -- which offers paid internships in the arts, technology, sports, and communications to teenagers in some of the city's most underserved schools -- finds a relationship between participating in after-school activities and higher class attendance, lower course failures and higher graduation rates.Even after taking into account student demographic characteristics and prior attendance records, students who participate in ASM miss fewer days of school than their classmates. Similarly, students who participated at the highest levels in the after-school program tended to fail fewer core academic courses (English, Math, Science, and Social Studies). Furthermore, over the course of their time in high school, students who were enrolled in ASM for three or more semesters and those who participated at the highest levels had higher rates of graduation and lower dropout rates than similar students who did not participate in the program.The findings in this report highlight the importance of further research into what leads students to participate in after-school programs and the factors that lead to higher engagement and retention once they are enrolled. A better understanding is crucial for improving enrollment in after-school programs such as ASM. Moreover, accounting for student factors that lead to a greater engagement in the program will lead to a clearer understanding of ASM's contribution to the positive outcomes -- independent of hard-to-observe student characteristics such as enthusiasm or dedication.

Student Outcomes

From Anecdote to Evidence: Assessing the Status and Condition of Arts Education at the State Level

November 1, 2006

Without solid evidence about the status and condition of arts education in the nation's public schools, it is difficult to make a convincing case for the arts. This research and policy brief draws on the experiences of five states -- Illinois, Kentucky, New Jersey, Rhode Island, and Washington -- as the basis for a discussion of various approaches and methodologies for conducting statewide arts education research.

Classroom Examples

Arts at the Core: Every School, Every Student

October 12, 2005

The profound impact of arts education on children and youth follows them throughout their lives. Arts education rewards our children by helping them to reach practical goals such as academic achievement and career success. Arts education enriches our youth with social, cultural and emotional benefits. As shown in study after study, a widely held belief in the positive value of arts education is shared by parents, teachers, school administrators and arts education experts.This belief is the reason that arts education has historically been an important part of the education of our children in the United States. However, deeper analysis both nationwide and here in Illinois reveals a gap between what individuals, educators and elected officials profess as the value of arts education and what is allocated to arts education in terms of budget, faculty, class time, curriculum, planning and evaluation.Illinois Creates is a broad-based statewide coalition of 150 education, business, civic and arts advocates dedicated to promoting a comprehensive, standards-based arts education program for all Illinois public school students.

Student Outcomes

2004 Updated Arts for All: Los Angeles County Regional Blueprint for Arts Education

November 10, 2004

ARTS FOR ALL: Los Angeles County Regional Blueprint for Arts Education provides guidance and an outline of how to achieve this vision. It presents a comprehensive series of policy changes, educational initiatives, and establishment of a new infrastructure to promote systemic and balanced provision of the arts, and identifies the roles of key stakeholders. The Blueprint proposes that systemic change can only occur through the cooperative participation of all stakeholders and by working to develop supportive policy and action at each level of involvement.Since 2002, when the Blueprint was adopted, much progress has been made toward achieving its vision and many new partners have been engaged in the process. Updates on pages 11 -- 17 reflect this forward movement.

Student Outcomes

Art, Artists and Teaching

July 1, 2003

Explores new ways to infuse the creative impulses of the arts and artists into education in America, at a symposium hosted by Bennington College and the J. Paul Getty Trust.

Program Models

Artists Residencies: Evolving Educational Experiences

January 1, 2003

Outlines the development of school residencies and offers four checklists for arts organization coordinators, artists, teachers, and school coordinators planning to develop residencies.

Program Models

2002 Original Arts For All: Los Angeles County Regional Blueprint for Arts Education

September 20, 2002

ARTS FOR ALL: Los Angeles County Regional Blueprint for Arts Education provides guidance and an outline of how to achieve this vision. It presents a comprehensive series of policy changes, educational initiatives, and establishment of a new infrastructure to promote systemic and balanced provision of the arts, and identifies the roles of key stakeholders. The Blueprint proposes that systemic change can only occur through the cooperative participation of all stakeholders and by working to develop supportive policy and action at each level of involvement.

Student Outcomes

Why Your Child Needs the Arts Advantage and How You Can Gain It

November 1, 2000

Highlights the findings of the two-year study Gaining the Arts Advantage: Lessons From School Districts that Value Arts Education.

Classroom Examples; Student Outcomes