In recent years many school districts have had to restructure their arts curriculums to meet the growing emphasis on standards that is central to most school reform. This unique collection is meant to assist educators, policymakers, grantmakers and other stakeholders by focusing on the potential benefits of arts education for students and communities alike, and providing examples of creative ways school districts are handling their constraints.

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Partnerships in Arts Integrated Research

January 25, 2013

The PAIR (Partnerships for Arts Integration Research) complete final report is an evaluation of a four year, federal Department of Education funded Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) project administered by the Chicago Arts Partnerships in Education (CAPE) in partnership with the Chicago Public Schools. This project brought together 3 pairings of school populations (a world languages focused magnet cluster school with a fine-arts focused magnet cluster school; a math and science focused magnet cluster school with a fine arts focused magnet cluster school; and a literature and writing focused magnet cluster school with a fine arts magnet cluster school) to work with teaching artists in 4th, 5th, and 6th grade classrooms. Results from the six schools were compared with six control schools of similar status, resources, student population, demographic factors, and comparable levels of academic achievement prior to the start of the PAIR project.The PAIR research and evaluation focuses extensively on teacher impact and student achievement. Two principal investigators noted for their work in the fields of teacher education, student learning, and arts in education teaching and learning practices engaged in this research: Dr. Gail Burnaford, School of Education faculty at Florida Atlantic University, who examined the impact of PAIR on classroom teachers, and Dr. Lawrence Scripp, Director of the Center for Music-In-Education, Inc, who analyzed student arts integration and academic learning outcomes and their relation to PAIR teacher professional development outcomes and controlled for student demographic factors. Burnaford's and Scripp's cumulative findings on the impact of PAIR on teacher professional development, student learning and the intersections between teacher and student outcomes over the three-year time period of the project are presented in the three-part comprehensive report.Lawrence Scripp and Laura Tan Paradis (PAIR research coordinator) provide a brief summary of the project findings as an addendum to the comprehensive three-part PAIR Report.

Program Models; Student Outcomes

PAIR Final Comprehensive Report Part 3: Analysis of PAIR Student Arts Integration Assessments and their Intersections with Teacher and Student Performance Outcomes

May 17, 2012

While the previous two parts of PAIR report focused entirely on the impact of PAIR on teacher professional development and on student standardized academic test results, Part 3 of the report is organized into seven sections that present the analysis of multiple student arts integration learning assessment results and the intersection among teacher-student outcome variables by the final year of the project. The results are reported in seven different sections, each featuring its own table of contents, list of figures and tables, and an appendix:A. Snapshots of Arts Integration (SAIL) Interview Response Ratings analyzed for control treatment and within-treatment school differences in students' understanding of arts integration processes and connections;B. PAIR Student Survey Responses analyzed for control-treatment school differences in the perception of arts integration practices in their classrooms and control-treatment schooldifferences in the presence of classroom culture practices most highly associated with PAIR professional development goals and outcomes;C. PAIR Partnership Arts Integration Learning (PAIL) Student Work Samples analyzed for qualitative differences among within PAIR treatment school classroom practices and in relation to the documentation and assessment goals for the PAIR project;D. PAIR Portfolio Conference Performance Assessments of teacher verbal reflections and student individual and group performance assessments analyzed for qualitative differences in PAIR treatment school PAIR student work and portfolio conference performance assessments.E. PAIR Portfolio Conference Performance Assessments of student individual and group performance assessment data analyzed statistically for their relationship to SAIL assessments, PAIL classroom ratings, and teacher portfolio conference performance data.F. PAIR Treatment School Teacher-Student Outcome Intersections analyzed for statistically significant degrees of association between teacher professional development variables analyzed and student learning outcome data.

Classroom Examples; Student Outcomes

PAIR Final Comprehensive Report Part 2: Impact of PAIR on Student Academic Performance

June 27, 2011

This report is the second part of a three-part comprehensive report filed by both Dr. Burnaford and Dr. Scripp, as Co-Principal Investigators of the PAIR project.The first report, written by Dr. Gail Burnaford [2010], focused primarily on three years of collecting evidence of progress meeting PAIR teacher professional development goals, the evolution of teacher professional development outcomes in comparison with control group teachers, and speculation on theg eneral impact of high quality PAIRteacher practices on student learning.The second and third parts of this report, written by Dr. Lawrence Scripp and his research team from the Center for Music-in-Education and CAPE (2011-2012], focus on the impact of PAIR on student learning. This second report (2011) reports primarily on differences among control-treatment statistical comparisons of PAIR student academic test outcomes. The following third report (2012) features an extensive review of qualitative and quantitative aspects all PAIR student arts integration outcome data. In addition, it provides a comprehensive analysis of the possible statistical links between seven teacher professional development factors and four student learning outcomes.In this paper reports on a research project in arts integration education, conducted in the Chicago Public Schools in partnership with Chicago Arts Partnerships in Education (CAPE), a research-based organization focused on optimizing the impact of artists and arts learning in schools for the benefit of whole-school improvement in arts learning, teacher professional development, and school culture.

Classroom Examples; Student Outcomes

Blueprints: Bringing Poetry Into Communities

January 31, 2011

Collects poets' essays on the need to bring poetry into communities through readings, festivals, and other projects and their experiences doing so; the impact of poetry on ideas of community; and models of programs. Offers a poetry programming toolkit.

Community Outcomes

Coming Up Taller

October 18, 2010

Coming Up Taller is a report filled with hope, a narrative about youth learning to paint, sing, write plays and poems, take photographs, make videos and play drums or violins. Here are stories of children who learn to dance, mount exhibitions, explore the history of their neighborhoods and write and print their own books. This report documents arts and humanities programs in communities across America that offer opportunities for children and youth to learn new skills, expand their horizons and develop a sense of self, well-being and belonging. Coming Up Taller is also an account of the men and women who share their skills as they help to shape the talents of children and youth and tap their hidden potentials. These dedicated individuals, often working long hours for little pay, are educators, social workers, playwrights, actors, poets, videographers, museum curators, dancers, musicians, muralists, scholars and librarians. The President's Committee believes strongly in the importance of including the arts and the disciplines of the humanities in the school curriculum. This study looks at what happens to young people when they are not in school and when they need adult supervision, safe places to go and activities that expand their skills and offer them hope. The individual programs described in this study take place in many locations, some unusual, in their communities. Children, artists and scholars come together at cultural centers, museums, libraries, performing arts centers and arts schools, to be sure. Arts and humanities programs also are based at public radio and television stations, parks and recreation centers, churches, public housing complexes, teen centers, settlement houses and Boys and Girls Clubs. In places unnoticed by mainstream media, acts of commitment and achievement are evident every day

Classroom Examples; Student Outcomes

PAIR Final Comprehensive Report Part 1: Teacher Impact

September 1, 2010

Forty years ago, there was widespread belief that teachers and schools had little influence on students' achievement independent of their socioeconomic background and context. More recent studies of teacher effects at the classroom level, however, such as those using the Tennessee Value-Added Assessment System, have found that differential teacher effectiveness is a strong determinant of differences in student learning, far outweighing the effects of differences in class size and heterogeneity.Students who are assigned to several ineffective teachers in a row have significantly lower achievement and gains in achievement than those who are assigned to several highly effective teachers in sequence. Teacher effects appear to be additive and cumulative, and generally not compensatory. These issues have been the topic of much other research over the last 50 years . More and more research is conducted with teacher practice and professional development as part of the context for investigating student outcomes. That is what the PAIR project has done during this research initiative. The Partnerships in Arts Integration Research (PAIR) project was a three-year initiative focused on the intersections between arts and non-arts content learning in two mathematics and science, two world languages and two writing Magnet Cluster Schools in Chicago. This section of the final report will focus on the impact of the project on the teachers, with particular attention to the third year of the project in which documentation was more intentional and systematic in each school. The 6 PAIR schools were matched with 6 control schools also in the Arts Magnet Cluster Schools program in Chicago Public Schools. A Year-End Curriculum and Teaching Survey was administered to 4th, 5thand 6th grade teachers in all twelve schools during Year Three of the project. Other data were also collected from the teachers in the 6 PAIR schools, including professional development session surveys and attendance figures, portfolio conference transcribed comments, student work and teacher practice labels and documentation from work completed at professional development sessions (documentation panels and curriculum maps).

Classroom Examples

An Unfinished Canvas: Local Partnerships in Support of Arts Education in California

April 16, 2009

In 2006, at the request of The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, SRI International conducted a study aimed at assessing the status of arts education in California relative to state goals. The final report, An Unfinished Canvas. Arts Education in California: Taking Stock of Policy and Practice, revealed a substantial gap between policy and practice. The study found that elementary schools in particular are failing to meet state goals for arts education. In light of these findings, The Hewlett Foundation commissioned a series of follow-up studies to identify policy mechanisms or other means of increasing student access to arts education. This study, focusing on the ability of school districts to leverage support for arts education through partnerships with local arts organizations, is one of the follow-up studies.Partnerships may allow for the pooling of resources and lend support to schools in a variety of ways including artists-in-residency programs, professional development for teachers, exposing students to the arts through the provision of one-time performances at school sites, and organizing field trips to performances and exhibits. According to the California Visual and Performing Arts Framework for California Public Schools, partnerships among districts, schools, and arts organizations are most successful when they are embedded within a comprehensive, articulated program of arts education. Questions about the nature of partnerships that California districts and schools have been able to form with arts organizations, and the success of these partnerships to increase students' access to a sequential standards-based course of study in the four arts disciplines, served as the impetus for this study.A team of SRI researchers conducted case studies of partnerships between districts and arts organizations in six diverse California communities in spring 2008. The case study sites were selected for their particular arts education activities and diverse contexts and, as a result, do not offer generalizable data about partnerships between school districts and arts organizations in California. Instead, we highlight the ways that a sample of partnerships promotes arts education in California elementary schools to inform others who may be interested in building partnerships between school districts and arts organizations.

Classroom Examples

Arts for All: the Vanguard Districts Case Studies

February 14, 2009

Arts for All: The Vanguard Districts -- Case Studies from the First Five Years fills a gap in our knowledge about arts education efforts. There is a robust and rigorous body of research on the impact of arts education on students but there is sparse research on the effective strategies for implementing, sustaining and stewarding arts education efforts. Not since Arts EducationPartnership's (AEP) Gaining the Arts Advantage (1999) has there been a comprehensive study of how school districts animate the arts in their schools. We believe these case studies and subsequent cross-case analyses offer new insights about the differences between planning to restore arts education and making that plan a reality.

Classroom Examples

Designing the Arts Learning Community: Model Professional Development Programs

February 3, 2009

Dawn Ellis and her team scoured the country for exemplary professional development programs in arts education to inform the content of the handbook and create a searchable database of 50 model programs. The handbook is both a guide and a reference resource for arts coordinators, principals, superintendents of instruction and anyone who designs professional development for K-12 arts education. It synthesizes documents, interviews, responses from outstanding practices in the field as well as literature regarding professional development and arts education. The programs profiled, which cover a wide range of partnership types, were selected because theyAddress the scale, scope, or perspectives of school districtsProvide evidence of evaluation, research, and/or reflective practiceProvide insights into approaches relevant to a variety of communities, students, and arts disciplines, orInvolve education reform that includes a strong arts component

Classroom Examples

An Unfinished Canvas: A Review of Large-Scale Assessment in K-12 Arts Education

September 16, 2008

Reviews the status of and current practices in statewide standards-based arts assessment for K-12 education accountability. Examines the approaches and criteria of several models of large-scale arts assessment and five states' assessment programs.

Program Models; Student Outcomes

The Workshop Out of School Guide

June 30, 2008

The guide is a direct result of the Workshop's After School for All (AFA) project, and was funded by the San Francisco Department of Children, Youth & Their Families. In the guide, Lead Writer (and former Associate Artistic Director) Anne-E Wood offers a thorough examination of arts engagement during after school time and in community centers. The Workshop Out of School provides a clear process for quality performing arts instruction that negotiates the specific challenges of after-school programs. The guide is divided by discipline into five chapters in which AFA artists outline the character of their disciplines: creative movement, world dance, theater arts, creative writing, and music. Each chapter includes an overview of the discipline, instructions on how to plan a quality curriculum, and how to negotiate behavior and content management within the class. Also included are a sample curriculum and a breakdown of individual lesson plans.

Classroom Examples

Revitalizing Arts Education Through Community-Wide Coordination

June 18, 2008

Based on site visits, interviews, and literature and document reviews, presents a comparative case study of how six community initiatives were launched to improve arts education through collaboration among multiple organizations and how they evolved.

Classroom Examples; Community Outcomes