In recent years many school districts have had to restructure their arts curriculums to meet the growing emphasis on standards that is central to most school reform. This unique collection is meant to assist educators, policymakers, grantmakers and other stakeholders by focusing on the potential benefits of arts education for students and communities alike, and providing examples of creative ways school districts are handling their constraints.

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The Retention of Chicago's Arts Students in Comparative Perspective

May 28, 2014

Highlights:* 58 percent of Chicago arts-school alumni took up residence in the city within 5 years of the date of their last attendance. Of the regions compared in this report, only New York City has a greater portion of its arts-school alumni taking up residence in the city within 5 years, at 66 percent.* 51 percent of Chicago arts-school alumni were out-of-state applicants who came to Chicago and were still living in the city within five years of their last date of attendance. This is the second highest portion of out-of-state applicants taking up residence in the city of their alma mater. New York City's rate was highest at 54 percent.* Of arts-school alumni who searched for work, 38 percent of those attending school in Chicago obtained work prior to leaving their institution; 85 percent obtained work within a year. Alumni from other regions had similar experiences.*50 percent of Chicago's alumni reported that their first job or work experience was "closely related" to their arts-school training. However, alumni from institutions in Los Angeles County, Cleveland/Columbus and New York City reported higher rates of their first work experience being closely related to their arts training.

An Unfinished Canvas: Arts Education in the San Francisco Bay Area - A Supplemental Status Report

June 15, 2007

This report complements An unfinished canvas. Arts education in California: Taking stock of policy and practices (Woodworth et al., 2007). The research supporting An Unfinished Canvas was undertaken to document the status of arts education in California schools and assess the extent to which schools were meeting state goals for arts education -- namely a sequential, standards-based course of study in music, visual arts, theatre, and dance. As part of that research effort, we included a sufficient number of schools in the nine Bay Area counties to enable us to report comparable data for each of the Bay Area counties as well as to draw comparisons between the Bay Area and the rest of the state.

Classroom Examples

Performing Arts Workshop 2003 AEMDD Evaluation Final Report

February 1, 2007

This report presents the outcomes from the final year of the Performing Arts Workshop Artists-in-Schools (AIS) program evaluation, conducted from 2003 to 2006. The AIS program offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 8 and 30 weeks in theatre arts, creative writing, creative movement, music and world dance. While AIS classrooms range from pre-kindergarten to 12th grade, the evaluation focused on elementary classrooms. AIS residencies emphasize problem-solving and critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. In 2006, the Workshop employed 26 artists who provided AIS residencies to 183 classrooms from pre-Kindergarten to 12h grade in 20 schools in 7 school districts. The report includes a foreword by Richard Siegesmund of the University of Georgia on key data findings; the Artists-in-Schools program methodology; the evaluation methodology; cumulative findings from this three-year project on critical thinking in the arts, arts and academic performance, the pedagogy for teaching at-risk youth, the arts and pro-social behavior and institutionalizing the arts in school settings; and recommendations. The appendices to this report include data collection instruments and informed consent forms.

Student Outcomes

Artists-In-Schools (AIS) Second-Year Annual Evaluation Report for the U.S. Dept. of Education (2004-05)

November 15, 2005

Over the course of three years, Performing Arts Workshop and evaluators measured five goals of the Workshop's Artists-in-Schools program. These goals were: to improve student critical thinking in the arts, to use the arts to positively impact academic performance, to identify problems in teaching at-risk youth, to use the arts to develop pro-social behavior, and to institutionalize arts and arts education in school settings to increase sustainability. The ability of the Artists-in-Schools program to meet these goals is examined through a quasi-experimental, mixed-method research design.

Student Outcomes

Spotlight on Arts Education Grantmaking in the San Francisco Bay Area

October 1, 2005

This Spotlight includes side by side comparisons of arts education giving by primary purpose and by target population, illustrating how funding in the Bay Area compares with funding nationally. A mini-directory of selected San Francisco Bay Area foundations making arts education grants in the Bay Area provides basic contact information along with selected grants.

Funding Trends

Artists-In-Schools (AIS) First-Year Annual Evaluation Report for the U.S. Dept. of Education (2003-04)

November 15, 2004

Over the course of three years, Performing Arts Workshop and evaluators measured five goals of the Workshop's Artists-in-Schools program. These goals were: to improve student critical thinking in the arts, to use the arts to positively impact academic performance, to identify problems in teaching at-risk youth, to use the arts to develop pro-social behavior, and to institutionalize arts and arts education in school settings to increase sustainability. The ability of the Artists-in-Schools program to meet these goals is examined through a quasi-experimental, mixed-method research design in the following reports.

Student Outcomes

Assessing Thinking In and Through the Arts: Second Year Evaluation of the California Arts Demonstration Project

August 30, 2003

For two years, the Workshop participated in an evaluation project run by the California Arts Council. The goals of this project were to identify potentially "at-risk" student populations and then evaluate the effects of a Creative Movement or Theatre residency in the classroom. Areas for student improvement were based on the Workshop's Cycle of Artistic Inquiry which seeks to demonstrate the process of critical thinking through arts learning. The following reports deal with the findings of this project at three separate locations: The Paul Robeson & Diego Rivera Academy, John Muir Elementary, and Mission Education Center.

Student Outcomes

First-Year Demonstration Project Report for the CAC (2001-02)

August 9, 2002

For two years, the Workshop participated in an evaluation project run by the California Arts Council. The goals of this project were to identify potentially "at-risk" student populations and then evaluate the effects of a Creative Movement or Theatre residency in the classroom. Areas for student improvement were based on the Workshop's Cycle of Artistic Inquiry which seeks to demonstrate the process of critical thinking through arts learning. The following reports deal with the findings of this project at three separate locations: The Paul Robeson & Diego Rivera Academy, John Muir Elementary, and Mission Education Center.

Student Outcomes